risk factors for transmission of ebola or marburg virus

Submit Demands Online

The Ebola virus disease outbreak that started in Western Africa in 2013 was unprecedented because it spread within densely populated urban environments and affected many thousands of people As a result previous advice and guidelines need to be critically reviewed especially with regard to transmission risks in different contexts Scientific and grey literature were searched for articles 2014/9/27The potential for transmission via inhalation of aerosols therefore cannot be ruled out by the observed risk factors or our knowledge of the infection process Many body fluids such as vomit diarrhea blood and saliva are capable of creating inhalable aerosol particles in the immediate vicinity of an infected person

Ebola virus and Marburg virus Disease Reference Guide

2020/4/1Ebola virus and Marburg virus Medically reviewed by Drugs Last updated on Apr 1 2020 Disease Reference On this page Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications Prevention Diagnosis Treatment Preparing for an appointment Overview Ebola virus and

2016/2/29This review summarises published evidence on presence of Ebola and the closely related Marburg virus (filoviruses) in body fluids of infected people and survivors though end July 2015 Scientific and other reports were searched for tests to detect filovirus in human body fluids on otherwise confirmed cases 33 reports had relevant test results

Risk of disease transmission between members without direct contact was low (1% 95% CI 0-5%) Caring for a case in the community especially until death and participation in traditional funeral rites were strongly associated with acquiring disease probably due to a high degree of direct physical contact with case or cadaver

Risk of disease transmission between members without direct contact was low (1% 95% CI 0-5%) Caring for a case in the community especially until death and participation in traditional funeral rites were strongly associated with acquiring disease probably due to a high degree of direct physical contact with case or cadaver

Risk factors for transmission of Ebola or Marburg virus disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis Int J Epidemiol 2016 Feb 45(1):102-16 Fischer WA 2nd Vetter P Bausch DG Burgess T Davey RT Jr Fowler R Hayden FG et al Ebola virus disease: an update on post-exposure prophylaxis

Ebola virus disease

Ebola survivors need comprehensive support for the medical and psychosocial challenges they face and also to minimize the risk of continued Ebola virus transmission To address these needs a dedicated programme can be set up for care for people who recovered from Ebola

Original article Risk factors for transmission of Ebola or Marburg virus disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis Julii Brainard 1 Lee Hooper 1 Katherine Pond 2 Kelly Edmunds3 and Paul R Hunter1* 1Norwich Medical School University of East Anglia Norwich UK 2Robens Centre for Public and

Case definition recommendations for Ebola or Marburg virus diseases 3 Definition of Ebola or Marburg contacts Important: During an outbreak contact definitions are likely to be adapted to newly reported infection risk factors related to the local event Ebola or Marburg case contacts

Risk Factors For most people the risk of getting Ebola or Marburg viruses (hemorrhagic fevers) is low The risk increases if you: Travel to Africa You're at increased risk if you visit or work in areas where Ebola virus or Marburg virus outbreaks have occurred

Marburg virus transmission Marburg virus has been found in monkeys chimps and fruit bats in Africa It is unknown how Marburg virus first transmits from its animal host to humans however for the 2 cases in tourists visiting Uganda in 2008 unprotected contact

Risk Factors For most people the risk of getting Ebola or Marburg viruses (hemorrhagic fevers) is low The risk increases if you: Travel to Africa You're at increased risk if you visit or work in areas where Ebola virus or Marburg virus outbreaks have occurred

Citation: Brainard J Hooper L Pond K Edmunds K Hunter PR Risk factors for transmission of Ebola or Marburg virus disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis International journal of epidemiology 2016 Feb 1 45(1):102-16 Summary: This review concludes that transmission of filovirus is unlikely except through close contact especially in the most severe stages of direct illness but more

Risk Factors for Transmission of Ebola or Marburg Virus Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Tools RDF+XML BibTeX RDF+N-Triples JSON RefWorks Dublin Core Simple Metadata Refer METS HTML Citation ASCII Citation OpenURL ContextObject EndNote OpenURL ContextObject in Span MODS MPEG-21 DIDL EP3 XML Data Cite XML Reference Manager RDF+N3 Multiline CSV

Risk factors for transmission of Ebola or Marburg virus

The Ebola virus disease outbreak that started in Western Africa in 2013 was unprecedented because it spread within densely populated urban environments and affected many thousands of people As a result previous advice and guidelines need to be critically reviewed especially with regard to transmission risks in different contexts Scientific and grey literature were searched for articles

Risk Factors for Transmission of Ebola or Marburg Virus Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Tools RDF+XML BibTeX RDF+N-Triples JSON RefWorks Dublin Core Simple Metadata Refer METS HTML Citation ASCII Citation OpenURL ContextObject EndNote OpenURL ContextObject in Span MODS MPEG-21 DIDL EP3 XML Data Cite XML Reference Manager RDF+N3 Multiline CSV

Ebola poses little risk to travelers or the general public who have not cared for or been in close contact (within 3 feet or 1 meter) with someone sick with Ebola Persistence of the virus The virus can remain in areas of the body that are immunologically privileged sites after acute infection

Marburg virus disease is a deadly but rare hemorrhagic fever similar to Ebola While the disease typically starts out like many other tropical illnesses with fever and body aches it can quickly lead to severe bleeding shock and death As many as nine in 10 people

Secondary transmission appears to be less common with Marburg virus than with Ebola virus the other known filovirus Keywords: Marburg virus disease Filoviridae infections Democratic Republic of the Congo cross-sectional studies disease transmission risk factors serology enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay fluorescent antibody technique disease reservoirs

In past outbreaks of Ebola virus disease and the related Marburg haemorrhagic fever cases were concentrated in a small number of geographical foci which simplified logistical demands Under such circumstances the principal responders WHO MSF and the US CDC could flood affected areas with staff and materials hunt the virus down and uproot it within several weeks to three months

Ebola and Marburg virus infections have also occurred after handling tissues from infected animals Filoviruses are highly contagious Human-to-human transmission occurs via skin and mucous membrane contact with body fluids (saliva blood vomit urine stool sweat breast milk semen) of an infected symptomatic person or rarely a nonhuman primate

Marburg virus transmission Marburg virus has been found in monkeys chimps and fruit bats in Africa It is unknown how Marburg virus first transmits from its animal host to humans however for the 2 cases in tourists visiting Uganda in 2008 unprotected contact